dwarfed. Blocks are cut out of the mountain, stand alone or remain attached to the 
mountain. One walks on marble, is surrounded by marble, in every direction, the 
eye alights on marble. There, Marxer says he feels very small — a sense of humblen- 
ess pervades, humbleness from which he could benefit ... 
In the terminology of marble extraction, the term “marble harvest” is used. This 
may also express the age-old respect for this stone. Marble is also mined and such 
“harvesting” may assume enormous proportions. The mountain is opened and giant 
cubes and slabs are removed, blockwise. The mountain interior resembles an enor- 
mous hall, with corners and angles, as though architects had thought them out. The 
incidence of light heightens the impression that an opera might be produced in these 
spaces. 
It is cloudy, the wind is blowing and it is unpleasantly cold. Nevertheless, the light 
in the workshop is very intense. The white marble is dazzling, like snow. Marxer is 
working outside, under a canopy, on a caryatid which he designed on the occasion of 
an invitation by the city of Münster to attend an international sculptor exhibition. 
The model, studded with dots, small and inconspicuous, serves Marxer as a pattern 
for the work on the original. Compass, chisel, hammer, grinder, crowbar, scalpello 
etc... are at hand. At work, devotion and seriousness are stamped on Marxer’s face. 
By way of trial, he erects another, nearly finished “small” caryatid, weighing 140 
kg. Its form bears some resemblance to the trunk of the old olive tree standing near 
Marxer’s workplace. The old tree’s convolutions are recognizable in the distortions 
of the marble torso — Marxer explains that the old tree’s form provided the first im- 
pulse for this work. 
There are other sculptures in the workshop, finished and unfinished. One of these is 
called “Prince and Princess”. Marxer means the Princely couple, Prince Franz Josef 
II. and Princess Gina. 
In contrast with other works by Marxer, the contours of this sculpture are angular, 
harsh, yet strangely soft. A softness that does not seem to suit this harshness. The 
view of the Principality of Liechtenstein from a distance inspired Marxer to take up 
a “Liechtenstein Theme”. In a related manner he has achieved the fusion of the 
Princely Couple and the Country of Liechtenstein. The geographical silhouette of 
the Country is discernible in the contours of the two reclining figures. It begins in 
the South, by Fürstensteig and ends in the North, in Ruggell. This sculpture of Spa- 
nish, black marble could be a work of respect dedicated to the Princely Couple. Ho- 
wever, Marxer did not wish to venture so far. With this, he has in any case comme- 
morated the Princely Couple. 
Si ce catalogue des oeuvres du sculpteur Hugo Marxer présente ses tout derniers ou- 
vrages, il est aussi destiné à accompagner ses expositions futures et à rendre son tra- 
vail plus transparent. 
Le marbre de Carrare, cette pierre blanc neige, veinée de nuances dégradées, dont 
la Renaissance a usé à profusion, exerce encore aujourd’hui un attrait ambigu sur les 
Français 
19 
 
        

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